Mary A. C. Fallon

Mary A. C. Fallon

Independent Filmmaker

Other Roles: Producer, Editor

Areas of Focus: Documentaries, Shorts

Biography

Mary A. C. Fallon is a multimedia journalist and storyteller focused on news and documentaries.

She earned a master’s degree in documentary filmmaking with highest honors from the University of Florida in 2005. Her film, 24/7, about the battle by people with development disabilities to get federal funds for at-home care, won the international Freddie Award in 2006 – the top prize in medical documentaries, among other awards.

She also is a freelance writer and editor, and leverages her 24 years of journalism experience – mostly covering technology and business in Silicon Valley – to coach executives how to successfully do media interviews and communications professionals to write and strategize.

Mary started covering technology businesses in Silicon Valley for the San Jose Mercury News the day Apple introduced its original Macintosh computer.

Besides reporting for newspapers in several states, her experience includes co-producing a national science and technology news program for premier public television station WGBH in Boston, helping start the first newsletter, Technology & Media, that analyzed the advent of the convergence of technology, business and entertainment; creating IDG’s original news reporting for its coveted DEMO.com conference for nascent technologies; and helping lead the transform of Gannett’s Florida Today from a once-daily newspaper to a 24/7 online news service – teaching reporters and photographers how to shoot and edit new videos.

Her additional 20 years of communications experience is peppered with forays into technology companies leading worldwide communications teams at Apple, HP, and Palm as well as helping a variety of start-ups tell their stories.

At Apple, Mary’s video, Wireless Coyote, showed the world how then-experimental wireless communications would change learning and teaching. She is credited with helping convince the Federal Communications Commission to allow data to move on radio waves. 

Mary has received several other news reporting awards, including two fellowships. Her worldview is influenced, in part, by 11 years volunteering as a court-appointed child advocate for abused and abandoned children. Her newest interest in how the human brain works and affects personality was prompted by her husband’s traumatic brain injury in late 2009.  http://www.maryacfallon.com  http://www.247themovie.com

 

 

Mary A. C. Fallon is a multimedia journalist and storyteller focused on news and documentaries.

 

Mary earned a master’s degree in documentary filmmaking with highest honors from the University of Florida in 2005. Her film, 24/7, about the battle by people with development disabilities to get federal funds for at-home care, won the international Freddie Award in 2006 – the top prize in medical documentaries, among other awards.

 

She also is a freelance writer and editor, and leverages her 24 years of journalism experience – mostly covering technology and business in Silicon Valley – to coach executives how to successfully do media interviews and communications professionals to write and strategize.

 

Mary started covering technology businesses in Silicon Valley for the San Jose Mercury News the day Apple introduced its original Macintosh computer.

 

Besides reporting for newspapers in several states, her experience includes co-producing a national science and technology news program for premier public television station WGBH in Boston, helping start the first newsletter, Technology & Media, that analyzed the advent of the convergence of technology, business and entertainment; creating IDG’s original news reporting for its coveted DEMO.com conference for nascent technologies; and helping lead the transform of Gannett’s Florida Today from a once-daily newspaper to a 24/7 online news service – teaching reporters and photographers how to shoot and edit new videos.

 

Her additional 20 years of communications experience is peppered with forays into technology companies heading worldwide communications teams at Apple, HP and Palm as well as helping a variety of start-ups tell their stories.

 

At Apple, Mary’s video, Wireless Coyote, showed the world how then-experimental wireless communications would change learning and teaching. She is credited with helping convince the Federal Communications Commission to allow data to move on radio waves. 

 

Mary has received several other reporting awards, including two fellowships. Her worldview is influenced, in part, by 11 years volunteering as a court-appointed child advocate for abused and abandoned children. Her newest interest in how the human brain works and affects personality was prompted by her husband’s traumatic brain injury in late 2009.  http://www.maryacfallon.com  http://www.247themovie.com

 

 

Mary A. C. Fallon is a multimedia journalist and storyteller focused on news and documentaries.

 

Mary earned a master’s degree in documentary filmmaking with highest honors from the University of Florida in 2005. Her film, 24/7, about the battle by people with development disabilities to get federal funds for at-home care, won the international Freddie Award in 2006 – the top prize in medical documentaries, among other awards.

 

She also is a freelance writer and editor, and leverages her 24 years of journalism experience – mostly covering technology and business in Silicon Valley – to coach executives how to successfully do media interviews and communications professionals to write and strategize.

 

Mary started covering technology businesses in Silicon Valley for the San Jose Mercury News the day Apple introduced its original Macintosh computer.

 

Besides reporting for newspapers in several states, her experience includes co-producing a national science and technology news program for premier public television station WGBH in Boston, helping start the first newsletter, Technology & Media, that analyzed the advent of the convergence of technology, business and entertainment; creating IDG’s original news reporting for its coveted DEMO.com conference for nascent technologies; and helping lead the transform of Gannett’s Florida Today from a once-daily newspaper to a 24/7 online news service – teaching reporters and photographers how to shoot and edit new videos.

 

Her additional 20 years of communications experience is peppered with forays into technology companies heading worldwide communications teams at Apple, HP and Palm as well as helping a variety of start-ups tell their stories.

 

At Apple, Mary’s video, Wireless Coyote, showed the world how then-experimental wireless communications would change learning and teaching. She is credited with helping convince the Federal Communications Commission to allow data to move on radio waves. 

 

Mary has received several other reporting awards, including two fellowships. Her worldview is influenced, in part, by 11 years volunteering as a court-appointed child advocate for abused and abandoned children. Her newest interest in how the human brain works and affects personality was prompted by her husband’s traumatic brain injury in late 2009.  http://www.maryacfallon.com  http://www.247themovie.com

 

 

Mary A. C. Fallon is a multimedia journalist and storyteller focused on news and documentaries.

 

Mary earned a master’s degree in documentary filmmaking with highest honors from the University of Florida in 2005. Her film, 24/7, about the battle by people with development disabilities to get federal funds for at-home care, won the international Freddie Award in 2006 – the top prize in medical documentaries, among other awards.

 

She also is a freelance writer and editor, and leverages her 24 years of journalism experience – mostly covering technology and business in Silicon Valley – to coach executives how to successfully do media interviews and communications professionals to write and strategize.

 

Mary started covering technology businesses in Silicon Valley for the San Jose Mercury News the day Apple introduced its original Macintosh computer.

 

Besides reporting for newspapers in several states, her experience includes co-producing a national science and technology news program for premier public television station WGBH in Boston, helping start the first newsletter, Technology & Media, that analyzed the advent of the convergence of technology, business and entertainment; creating IDG’s original news reporting for its coveted DEMO.com conference for nascent technologies; and helping lead the transform of Gannett’s Florida Today from a once-daily newspaper to a 24/7 online news service – teaching reporters and photographers how to shoot and edit new videos.

 

Her additional 20 years of communications experience is peppered with forays into technology companies heading worldwide communications teams at Apple, HP and Palm as well as helping a variety of start-ups tell their stories.

 

At Apple, Mary’s video, Wireless Coyote, showed the world how then-experimental wireless communications would change learning and teaching. She is credited with helping convince the Federal Communications Commission to allow data to move on radio waves. 

 

Mary has received several other reporting awards, including two fellowships. Her worldview is influenced, in part, by 11 years volunteering as a court-appointed child advocate for abused and abandoned children. Her newest interest in how the human brain works and affects personality was prompted by her husband’s traumatic brain injury in late 2009.  http://www.maryacfallon.com  http://www.247themovie.com

 

 

 
 

Films

24/7 (2005)

Role: Independent Filmmaker

True heroism is found not in dramatic events, but in day-to-day struggles. 24/7 portrays the experience of helping developmentally disabled adults with their most basic human needs all day, every day so they can live at home and avoid institutionalization. 24/7 reveals a world invisible to most of us. Yet it is a situation many families deal with today, and one that many more will face tomorrow. 24/7 unfolds as a story of frustration, courage and joy as parents and professional caregivers cope with Florida’s inability to provide desperately needed resources.

Throughout the United States, most state-funded care institutions, some quite terrible places to live, have closed. A better and cheaper alternative – at-home care – is not well funded in Florida and many other states. People are waiting years for help they need now. 24/7 brings to light their struggle and demonstrates nothing is more potent than love.

24/7 – the battle for at-home care – sheds light on a world invisible to most of us. It weaves the story of teenager Megan Holl and middle-aged Stuart Kessler, whose parents independently struggle with the challenges of caring for their developmentally disabled children while fighting with the state of Florida for financial assistance. For six months in 2005, University of Florida graduate students Mary A. C. Fallon and Daniel Priest recorded the daily care routines producing a cinéma vérité style survival story that reveals that just because a families are eligible and desperate for help, doesn’t mean governments deliver.

[ watch trailer ]